Brazil’s president-elect asks Temer to resign

Brazil’s far-right president-elect Jair Bolsonaro wants President Michel Temer to resign, but a group of senators on Wednesday said he should be charged with crimes against humanity. Brazil’s federal police say they have found…

Brazil's president-elect asks Temer to resign

Brazil’s far-right president-elect Jair Bolsonaro wants President Michel Temer to resign, but a group of senators on Wednesday said he should be charged with crimes against humanity.

Brazil’s federal police say they have found more than 1,200 mass graves in the Amazonian state of Roraima where members of the military dictatorships that ruled Brazil from 1964 to 1985 are believed to have been buried. The police are also checking claims that members of Brazil’s military were complicit in the killing of 13 elected officials, including members of the Barragata Brazil party.

Bolsonaro’s campaign has denied any involvement in the crimes.

Brazilian senator Sergio Moro, the former judge who led Brazil’s so-called “Operation Car Wash” probe into corruption, will review allegations that military dictatorships from 1964 to 1985 were involved in human rights violations, authorities said on Wednesday.

Moro is running the Brazilian Justice Institute, the government unit responsible for processing any criminal investigations. It is set to receive the allegations from courts this week, a police spokesman told reporters.

Under Brazilian law, there is no statute of limitations on crimes against humanity, although past convictions can count toward that limit.

Twenty-six mass graves have been found in the Brazilian Amazon, as well as one in Roraima state, according to federal police.

Police also found 16 clandestine graves in Rio de Janeiro on Wednesday, and arrested three suspects on drug trafficking charges.

Earlier this month, Rio’s former mayor, Eduardo Paes, acknowledged having received a political donation that may have been a bribe from the São Paulo state government in exchange for the 2006 Republican National Convention in Rio de Janeiro.

The 5.2-million-euro ($5.9 million) contribution reportedly came from Eduardo Freitas, a billionaire tycoon whose company provides subsidized housing for the military and police. Freitas’s wife is a state senator who was elected last year, according to the newspaper O Globo.

Paes denied wrongdoing, and the case was later dropped.

Brazil’s Supreme Court recently approved Bolsonaro’s cabinet picks, and he will be inaugurated on Jan. 1, 2019. The inauguration will mark the end of the impeachment and removal of leftist President Dilma Rousseff.

Bolsonaro won last month’s general election by a margin of more than 10 percentage points over Workers Party candidate Fernando Haddad, who is also a member of Brazil’s Workers Party.

In a Twitter post on Wednesday, Bolsonaro tweeted that he plans to build a national “advisory council of experts” as part of his plan to reform the constitution. He said this would include experts “who live and work in Brazil.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Leave a Comment