Death, disease and vaccine: children’s vaccinations ignored in mystery case

Two school-age children in Ohio became infected last month, just over a year after a vaccine was made The tracking system for young children receiving vaccinations in the US has come under severe criticism…

Death, disease and vaccine: children's vaccinations ignored in mystery case

Two school-age children in Ohio became infected last month, just over a year after a vaccine was made

The tracking system for young children receiving vaccinations in the US has come under severe criticism for failing to detect a third child who became infected from a contagious strain of the human papillomavirus that was approved for use in 2016.

Two school-age children in Ohio became infected last month, just over a year after a vaccine was made available. The Central Ohio Health District, which examined surveillance data from last year, did not discover the infection until this month.

The disease is transmitted when an infected person ingests, or “exults”, a virus. Vaccination is needed to prevent cervical, vulvar and vaginal cancers, most of which are caused by the human papillomavirus.

To carry out its investigation, the health district looked at 78,748 home visits that took place during the first five months of 2018, and compared it with the monitoring data from each day from the past year.

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The health district revealed that two children had become infected, one in September 2017 and one in August 2018. The children received the vaccine – Cervarix – in January 2016. A smaller number of children in central Ohio became infected from a separate vaccine, HPV16, that was approved in April 2016.

The report said it was impossible to determine if the infections might have been prevented by additional vaccinations, but that both vaccines should be given on time after a diagnosis of HPV infection is made.

Alex Isaacson, a member of Ohio health department’s advisory board and US Preventive Services Task Force, told the Columbus Dispatch: “For healthcare providers, the takeaway message is patients must get two doses. It’s really very important they do that, based on screening data that shows they get two doses.”

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