Facebook to show fake news on the front page

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Facebook says that fake news articles or photos widely shared are removed from your news feed When you click on a seemingly reputable article, Facebook will often alert…

Facebook to show fake news on the front page

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Facebook says that fake news articles or photos widely shared are removed from your news feed

When you click on a seemingly reputable article, Facebook will often alert you to dodgy sources in your feed.

The social network will also take steps to stop you seeing many of them if they fail to meet its quality bar, such as if their content has been disputed.

These are examples of the kind of fake news that Facebook is identifying at the moment.

An image of Barack Obama playing Monopoly.

Photo sharing site Imgur was overloaded on Saturday with complaints about a fake news post, which showed Barack Obama using Monopoly money to buy property in New Jersey.

The post, according to PolitiFact, is a “traditional faké”.

After the story hit Google’s Search bar, many others were flagged, with claims that the Obamas had hung a doll from a Second- Amendment tree.

Google was unable to confirm whether the search was genuine or not.

Another politician, Republican Cory Gardner of Colorado, came under pressure on Saturday from tweeters who claimed he was responsible for another fake news post on Facebook about vaccinations.

He swiftly and publicly tweeted: “I am a vaccine safety advocate. Such an idiotic post on my feed. I’m reviewing it.”

Photo sharing site Imgur was flooded with complaints about a fake news post, which showed Barack Obama using Monopoly money to buy property in New Jersey. Image caption The post has been shared more than one million times.

The CNN article described how Mr Obama would then try to evict the rich to give everyone a better life.

However, if a website the writer used was disputed by a site such as Snopes, Facebook would not remove the story from Facebook.

If the story had been shared by an other publisher, the app would alert Facebook to the fact it had been shared with a fact-checker, such as the Washington Post’s.

Publishers could also flag the story so Facebook would know to remove it if it was a fact.

Take a look at the “factcheckable” list here.

Facebook has been criticised for enabling the spread of fake news on its social network and its competitors such as Twitter.

In September, Facebook laid out how it plans to tackle the problem, saying it would keep scanning millions of articles each day.

Curtis Roberts, of the Washington DC-based Social Context Institute, says the social network’s attempts to tackle the problem are counter-productive.

He says: “It’s disconcerting and Facebook is a very large company that can market to the public and they often try to respond to public pressures with their products.

“But this is a good reminder that they’re really not in the business of fixing news.

“I don’t have any doubts that Facebook will fix these issues one day but it doesn’t need to be done in the short term.”

Click here to see a gallery on some of the most popular fake news stories over the past week.

Facebook’s Tips

Look for stories with red flags

Pin the article in your search

Subscribe to Facebook’s Trending Feed

Use Facebook Assistant

Delete and/or report links

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