Ghanaians take down a mural in Lagos

Written by D, a, v, i, d, , e, o, n, h, a, r, d, t When we decided to leave the United States to our parents’ homeland of Nigeria after college, we thought…

Ghanaians take down a mural in Lagos

Written by D, a, v, i, d, , e, o, n, h, a, r, d, t

When we decided to leave the United States to our parents’ homeland of Nigeria after college, we thought of returning as soon as we had found something meaningful to do. What we didn’t think about was the state of the country and the ensuing political and socio-economic instability that could lead to us coming home.

We soon found we had found ourselves in a “treat us like visitors” state of mind, which creates strange alliances with our parents. At some point, we came up with a protestant strategy, marrying together peace and love. The protestant campaign pledged, “To put the stress of politics aside, however momentarily, and treat each other like family.” (There has been no mention of the promise of jobs, housing, safety, health care, security, or any other financial support from anyone.) This particular “treat us like family” approach meant putting aside political differences for a short while, and we were fast running out of time.

Nigeria’s emirate customs and traditions “are not for those without principles,” writes Elizabeth Marter, but “just as politics are not for children without values, faith is not for everyone without a sense of their own identity.”

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