Hotel with a real cave is perfect place for wildlife and wildlife photography

Written by Staff Writer at CNN The river, which turns an eerie green after an aftershave hits the land, is silent, save for a few crows. Overlooking it, a small village works on its…

Hotel with a real cave is perfect place for wildlife and wildlife photography

Written by Staff Writer at CNN

The river, which turns an eerie green after an aftershave hits the land, is silent, save for a few crows. Overlooking it, a small village works on its shift. Clouds drift in over the pines and the hum of a train rumbles past.

“Don’t forget to smile” signs cross the road as a truck slows and rolls by. This is the setting for a flash photography session in the French region of Poitou-Charentes, as part of an exhibition called “Wild Kingdom: The Art of Running the Pond.” Organized by the Fine Art Photography Foundation , the show is the first installation of its kind that “serves as a medium to ignite contemporary ideas” in the realm of wildlife photography.

According to curator Ron Karabell, who uses the term “timelapse” to describe his technique, “timelapses allow us to not only see animals, but also know about them.” He suggests that the photographs provide a “true reflection” of the animals’ movements.

“The process of running the pond is about patience,” Karabell said. “The pond is big and the light is different every day. Eventually, we got to a point where the colors did not seem to be that vibrant anymore and the light was dimmer. So I needed to bring in a gray layer, which is the basis of the colors, and the scale.”

Copyright: Courtesy Fine Art Photography Foundation

When they began, the photos that represented the images they wanted to achieve never really existed. Karabell had to explore the “perception of what it means to photograph,” while nature was otherwise still in the field.

“I wanted to have the sense of the animal — I wanted it to be seductive,” he added. “Sometimes you can go into the field and catch a bird because they look so beautiful and beautiful but you don’t capture the image because you’re just being lucky or because of the lighting or the light. These short moments. I wish I had a moment when I captured that perfect shot.

“There are a lot of times when I capture something that is very, very beautiful and powerful, but I leave the field because I go home and I don’t think about it. And I’m really frustrated.”

Copyright: Courtesy Fine Art Photography Foundation

The 3,000 photographs in the exhibit, shot in different countries, include varied scenes of the natural world. A butterfly swarms in the leafy backdrop of a park in the South of France. A barn owl darts towards his prey. A fierce lion, his two horns twisted, pokes his head out of a dense forest.

The images point to the diversity of themes facing today’s wildlife photographers. Large eddying canyons and overflowing tide pools, narrow paths carved into the countryside and a dark, marshy, desert road can all be found within a stone’s throw.

“That’s the whole idea of our current work, our effort to be as fluid as possible with the wild environment,” Karabell said. “There are not always just two images. People say, ‘is it OK that I’m in a very tricky shot?’ And I say ‘no,’ because I’m being very flexible, taking advantage of situations I might find myself in.’ “

Copyright: Courtesy Fine Art Photography Foundation

Patience was one key ingredient to Karabell’s success, but it wasn’t necessarily the most important thing. “I believe in a strong vision, but I have the feeling that you can’t just follow your vision, you have to follow the light. I try to do things as quickly as possible.”

Taking risks is “like chancing upon a treasure,” Karabell added.

If the works are at all indicative of the curators overall strategy, he is certainly not going to be averse to those unexpected events.

“I find it extremely hard to do these portraits with animals because they’re so precious,” he said. “I’m not a big fan of animals. Sometimes you can handle a stone by a snail, but I get tense when I photograph an animal.”

Copyright: Courtesy Fine Art Photography Foundation

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