Series with a bite: scary ghost and ghoul stories for young readers

“World of Darkness: Demons, Ghouls and Haunted Houses” by Catherine Allison (Wiley, $24.95, ages 8 to 12) In the fourth installment of the legendary World of Darkness series, high schooler Asa travels through the…

Series with a bite: scary ghost and ghoul stories for young readers

“World of Darkness: Demons, Ghouls and Haunted Houses” by Catherine Allison (Wiley, $24.95, ages 8 to 12)

In the fourth installment of the legendary World of Darkness series, high schooler Asa travels through the netherworld to be reunited with his forbidden love, Nicole. Or so he thinks. “Family Is a Nightmare” (three months and counting)!

This delightful fantasy series is appropriate for every age and plot point.

“Creepy Ghosts in Ghost Town” by Elaine Burroughs (Candlewick, $12.99, ages 8 to 12)

In a spectralized town with a creepy mountain that hosts “Freaks,” a young girl must discover a secret buried deep in the past to solve the mystery of her long-lost uncle.

Like other books in the Creepy Ghosts series, this is an exciting, laugh-out-loud murder mystery about human and enchanted ghosts. In this thriller, Brianna has always believed her uncle is dead. Then she learns he’s become a servant for the Demon King, who has told her to do what she must to save everyone in her town from the doomed Freaks who haunt the mountain.

Written with style and insight, Elaine Burroughs’ new book is rich with inside jokes, intricate descriptions and monsters who are lovely to look at.

“Ghost Tree” by Adam Sparks (Candlewick, $14.99, ages 8 to 12)

Get ready for a paranormal holiday this year with “Ghost Tree,” the latest in the award-winning Ghost Town series. The mountain is sweet for you, but on a dark night the forest is upside down and there are ghouls and monsters. New Zealand author Adam Sparks has made a connection that divides the spirits of the woods and the trees. In “Ghost Tree,” Grace’s father works with those who control the trees and brings the apparitions to town. What Grace and her little brother don’t know is that the family’s own haunted tree has reappeared.

Funny and scary, “Ghost Tree” spins a delightful yarn about family dynamics and how memories might keep you from being able to learn from the mistakes of the past.

“The Girl in the Trees” by Tim McNeill (St. Martin’s Griffin, $17.99, ages 10 to 13)

Based on the acclaimed and award-winning book trilogy, “The Girl in the Trees” takes an energetic and genuine look at how green needles and branches form in winter, and what that means for growing creatures like trees and birds, and the creatures of the forest. “This is the story of the many lines that crisscross our trees that — as the seasons change — form together into one big tree and somehow define each person on this planet,” author Tim McNeill writes.

Children also may learn about relationships, parental love and commitment. An original story set in, and inspired by, Greene Isle, “The Girl in the Trees” features lots of funny and familiar creatures in an unconventional place.

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