Washington Post’s Rick Salutin brings his new novel to Politics and Prose on Thursday

After 20 years of Cold War memoirs, movie scripts and songs – many of them less about the geopolitical crisis than Mr. Salutin’s own life and marriage – we’re back. He riffs: “We’re pulling…

Washington Post's Rick Salutin brings his new novel to Politics and Prose on Thursday

After 20 years of Cold War memoirs, movie scripts and songs – many of them less about the geopolitical crisis than Mr. Salutin’s own life and marriage – we’re back.

He riffs: “We’re pulling out the old tricks and shoehorning in the new ones …. These things are working – we’re still a nuclear power.”

In “The Prisoner of Atlas,” Rick Salutin’s 20th book, we’re also entering “Operation Midnight Train,” his fifth book for OR Books, about an alleged ruse by the Soviet Union to develop a H-bomb by splitting a nearly identical fission bomb in the United States. Mr. Salutin has some serious questions.

Salutin, who penned an 11th book, “The Carnivor Dance,” set in our own nation’s capital, will be guest of honor at the Politics and Prose Bookstore with his newest memoir “The Prisoner of Atlas” on Thursday evening. I’ll get his one-on-one with some questions for him after the book signing.

For starters, we must get a definitive answer from U.S. Army missile warning: Did the Soviets ever build a “perfect nuclear bomb?”: No, says Rick Salutin, and former Soviet agents told the FBI as much.

Rick Salutin is the author of six books. A true literary rebel, he has published “The Carnivor Dance: Tales from the Listening Post,” “The Low Down,” “Redmeat,” “Mojave Blues,” “Middle American Food Culture” and several others. His first novel, “Rick Salutin’s 1st Book of Food,” was a New York Times Best Seller. He has won three Pushcart Prizes and “Book Reviewer’s Choice” awards from LA Weekly, Boston Herald, L.A. Times and other publications. Mr. Salutin is also a two-time recipient of the prestigious Joseph Roth Fiction Award for Outstanding First Fiction. He is also an avid historian, plays the flute, flies an airplane and collects spoons, shakers and buckles. His work has appeared on NPR’s “On the Media,” the “Chicago Defender,” “Gulf Coast Life” and countless other newspapers. He’s been featured in Rolling Stone, Vanity Fair, Esquire, Esquire International, and elsewhere. A Shaughnessy Minor Award winner for High Potential Journalism and a Southern Scribe: Society of Professional Journalists, he’s also the recipient of the Presidential Award for Exceptional Contribution to Journalism, the John W. Smith-William Howard Taft Award and a Legacy Award. He was awarded an honorary doctorate from Howard University College of Law.

Mr. Salutin was born in Tucson, Ariz., and studied at the Columbia School of Journalism before he was drafted in 1966.

The Politics and Prose Bookstore (4345 Connecticut Ave. NW) hosts Rick Salutin at 6 p.m. on Thursday, June 28 with copies of “The Prisoner of Atlas” at the signing table. Politics and Prose is donating 100 percent of the sales to the print-on-demand publishing company OYA Ibarra Small Press.

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